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Escape From The Balkans

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Escape From The Balkans


Published 1943
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER PAGE
I Into Darkness
II Herr Drexler of the Gestapo 28
III Why I Didn't Kill Hitler 40
IV The Reichswehr Marches 55
V Where Homer Once Lived 61
VI Balkan Unity 81
VII Boris the Last 89
VIII Oil for Hitler's Tanks 97
IX Cripps the Prophet 112
X The American Spy 130
XI Taxi Drivers to the Rescue 151
XII Stalin Proposes, Hitler Disposes 156
XIII The Conference 163
XIV "The Rest is Silence ..." 174
XV What a Story! 181
XVI Robin Hood or Quisling? 195
XVII Only Moscow Knows 202
XVIII "Long Live Yugoslavia" 206
XIX Sky Guerrillas 229
XX The Red Flag Attacks 247
XXI Sonya's Life 254
XXII Sonya's Death 273
XXIII No German Will Leave the Balkans Alive! 278
XXIV No Man's Land 283
XXV Escape 299

FOREWORD
"In the summer of 1941, some weeks after Germany's attack on Russia, several hundred parachutists were dropped in the Balkans by Red Army planes to combat the occupying forces in all the Balkan countries and to assist in the organization of underground anti-Axis activities. Later in the year I myself saw some of these parachutists at work. I saw them fight and I saw them die. Their heroism inspired me to write their story and that story forms part of this book. But they had something more and rarer than courage: they were animated by a clear and steadfast ideal and for that ideal they fought and died. These parachutists were not Russians — they were Bulgarians, Croats, Greeks, Rumanians, Serbs and Slovenes. They fought — and some of them still fight — together, and their example has laid the foundations of Balkan underground unity on revolutionary bases. This underground unity, in my opinion, is the most significant political phenomenon of the war as far as the Balkans and Southeastern Europe are concerned. It is bound to have — as indeed present conditions (Spring 1943) in Yugoslavia show — great repercussions throughout the Balkans and will be one of the most important factors to be reckoned with when peace comes. Unfortunately this unity is hardly realized or taken into account in Britain and in the United States, in spite of the great interest that is in evidence in both countries toward the peace problems of Europe."

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"First edition"


Publisher Indianapolis, New York, The Bobbs-Merrill company
Year 1943
Pages 328
Language English
Collection wwIIarchive; additional_collections

Full catalog record MARCXML

[Open Library icon]This book has an editable web page on Open Library.

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